AGU 2014 – Day Two

The second day started drier than yesterday, at least concerned the weather. As a first session I went to a software publication session. The most interesting topic for me therein is of cause whether it would be possible to design a formal software publication with peer review and all the other necessities to make it comparable to traditional publication. I saw some first steps into this direction and am very excited about the future developments in this field. Continue reading

A stronger publication regime

Last week several journals have published an agreement made on an National Insurance in Health (NIH) workshop in June 2014. It focus on preclinical trials, but allows a wider view on the development of the publication of research in general. Furthermore, large journals, like Science and Nature have accompanied this with further remarks on their view on the future of proper documentation of scientific research, which head into the direction I named Open methods, open data, open models.” a while ago. In this post I would like to comment the agreement and some reactions from these major journals.

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Data peer review paper background: Chances for the future

The environment for the publication of data is currently changing rapidly. New data journals emerge, like Scientific Data from Nature two weeks ago or Geoscience Data Journal by Wiley. The latter was also in the focus of the PREPARDE project, which delivered a nice paper on data peer review a couple of weeks ago (Mayernik et al, 2014). Furthermore, more and more funding agency require the publication of data and it is to expect that this demand will lead to more pressure for scientists to make their work publicly available.

These developments are great, but at this point I would like to think further into the future. Where should we be in five or ten years, and what is possible in let’s say 30 or more years. A lot is the answer, but let’s go a little bit more in the details. Continue reading